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Less is necessarily not more

Covid-19

There is a significant difference between inconsiderably carrying on with your life as it was before the crisis and responsibly choosing a safe mode to travel when it is unavoidable to maintain economic life. This will be the way leading to the end of the crisis. In doing so, business aviation can make an important contribution.

October 1929 marked the beginning of a severe economic crisis. The main characteristics of this crisis were a heavy decrease in industrial production, international trade, international cash flows, a noticeable deflationary spiral, illiquidity of a large number of enterprises and massive unemployment. These factors lead to the outbreak of social misery and a political crisis. The crippling economy was the cause of poverty in many countries, but mainly for the disastrous situation in the US and Europe. Looming and real poverty caused fear and mistrust within the society. People fearfully protected their assets and looked for a culprit. 

Those who are familiar with history will get a bad feeling about the recent developments – today in 2020. Back then the fear of loss was the precondition that allowed protectionism and radical ideas to take root, and looking back the dramatic consequences are crystal clear. The current crisis has a different cause, but the consequences, which are already starting to show, are the same: unemployment, decrease in production, insolvencies of entrepreneurs, small- and medium-sized businesses. However, unlike any previous crisis this time the economy is equally affected on the demand and supply side.

This is why in today’s global crisis, caused by an invisible virus, we have to make sure that small companies, sole trader, family businesses and medium-size companies are able to make it through these hard times and survive. As the pandemic continues, the economic framework must be maintained and work as well as service provision should remain possible. Certainly, this won’t be an easy task – to make it work, solidarity, creativity and flexibility is mandatory on the part of corporations, customers and policymakers.

Harvard University economist Kenneth Rogoff writes: ‘’I could be wrong, but this crisis has the potential to cause permanent damage… There are three things that we should do, both in the US and in Europe. First, really importantly, we need massive expenses in the health care sector, investment for emergency equipment etcetera… Secondly, the industries affected by the crisis have to be protected. The hospitality industry, to some extent the airlines, they’re bystanders here. They didn’t create this…Then you have to help the low-income earners directly.’’

Apart from bailouts and tax reliefs, the scope of providing services could be amended to cater to the current situation. Already there are plenty of spontaneous ideas and incentives around. For example, instead of eating out once or twice per week customers can get the food delivered to their homes. Local stores could open on request and serve customers one at a time following strict hygiene requirements.

And once the circumstances allow, a flight ticket could be available at a higher price, but therefore only with 50% of the total capacity. While this would imply serious cuts, it would not be a total loss, either for the service provider nor the customer.

In Business Aviation this concept already works. Aircraft are chartered on demand by individuals and fly them home or provide essential travel. Meanwhile, social distancing and lock-down isolation are not violated. 

There is a significant difference between inconsiderably carrying on with your life as it was before the crisis and responsibly choosing a safe mode to travel when it is unavoidable to maintain economic life. This will be the way leading to the end of the crisis. In doing so, business aviation can make an important contribution.

Passengers attend individually, the recommended distance between persons can be ensured at any time and touchpoints along the travel process are reduced to a minimum. Additionally, the clients have the entire aircraft to themselves and do not share the cabin with anyone else, except their companions. Aircraft are strictly and regularly cleaned and disinfected. 

The same goes for the airline’s crew members, direct human interaction is significantly reduced. All AirGO crew members received training on sanitary measures and follow a hygiene-protocol. Furthermore, the crew’s schedules were adjusted so that every member has a 14-day break after a period of flying duty.

We are continuing operations even now, during the current Corona crisis, and we can perform emergency-flights for our clients.

Our customer service team is available for you 24/7 please contact sales@airgo.de or call +496131 540 630 for urgent assistance.

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